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Hot Wheels + Viral Cybertruck Video = Monetized! W/Jereme Guidas (Com and Collected: FAST LANE) Ep. 2

 
What we talk about:
 
Is the Iphone the best bang for your buck camera?
 
Cut, Cut, Cut, and then Cut ✂ your videos down even more!
 
Should you post to FB Groups/Your FB to get views or is it a bad idea 😦 ?
 
You literally know nothing when you start and that’s okay! (What you knew 3 months ago and what you will know now will change…EMBRACE IT!)
 
 
 
 
Two Ways I Can Help You Today:
 
Watch my YT Channel: Jeff Parker Creations
 
Follow me on Insta! JeffPCreations
 
 
 Subscribe to Jereme’s Channel!
 
 
References:
 
 

Full Episode Transcript

Welcome everybody to the first episode of content creators library. Our first guest is Jeremy. One cool thing to happen to Jeremy is that is one of his videos, almost a million views compared to his other videos. This is huge. This is basically a viral video. We talk about that, how we got there. Let’s not waste your time though.

Jeff: Just get into it and let’s start the show.

Jeff: Well, you can just explain, you know, who you are and what your channel is.

Jereme: All right. Well, my name is Jeremy Guidas and I have two YouTube channels now, actually, but, uh, it’s Com and Collected and Com and Collected: Fast Lane we’re actually just going through some growing pains in our channel, basically just split in two so that’ll be something I’m sure we’ll, we’ll kind of get into a little bit more.

Jeff: Where did the name come from? What is Com and Collected: Fast Lane supposed mean?

Jereme: So I think basically the idea was, I mean, obviously it’s Com C.O.M. And collected, I guess I should have explained that. So Com C.O.M and it kind of references comic books, but to Steve and I, my partner on the channel, it’s also Com like Comic-Con convention. So because we always want it to be able to feature anything that we were collecting, whether it’s action figures or comic books die-cast or anything that really could encompass like something you would see at a convention.

Jereme: That’s kind of where the Com comes from, but as far as it being Com andCollected and a play on words, it’s just a matter of like us being like pretty peaceful agreeable guys. And when we make videos and we discuss things, we’re usually pretty level-headed, and we’re not the kind of YouTuber where that’s going to be super opinionated and like argue and say like controversial things.

Jereme: So that’s kind of where the Com comes from.

Jeff: So how long did you, when did you start a YouTube channel? Like, did you have the hobby before you started the YouTube channel?

Jereme: So, well, there’s a couple of different things. So, I mean, I’ve been collecting since I was a little kid, but, um, I, we started our channel in late 2016. We recorded some of our first videos. That’s really, when we like, decided that we wanted to have a YouTube channel. And we were really inspired by an action figure YouTuber named Glenn Webb.

Jereme: Uh, anyone who’s interested in action figures probably knows Glenn Webb the YouTuber, and he passed away in August of 2016 and looking back at the timeline of how our channel started, I think that had a bigger impact on me than I even realized because of the timing, but it was the first Youtuber that I ever really got to know and like, and then have them pass away.

Jereme: And it was like shocking how much it hit me that I, that it was, it was like a friend, you when you watch a YouTuber, you get to know them and you really do feel like it was a friend who passed away. And still a few months after that, I think we started recording some videos and Steve and I are friends from college, but we live in different cities.

Jereme: So I’m in Pittsburgh and he’s in Baltimore, Maryland. Well, actually Annapolis. But, um, so for us, It was hard. We only got together a few times a year and we were thinking at that time in 2016 that we could only make a video once we met up. So if we met a few times a year and he would like come to Pittsburgh and we would go to a to a Comic-Con would be opportunity to make a video.

Jereme: So that was kind of the idea. And we filmed like six videos in a month or two, and then it took me several months to edit them and get them out. So really after like two years, we had only published five videos and then the channel had a rebirth in 2020 because suddenly the whole world was like virtual and zooming was so easy and made so much sense.

Jereme: And we kind of realized, even if Steve wasn’t literally coming to Pittsburgh to go to a convention where we could make a video together, we could make videos together via zoom. So that was literally what allowed our channel to like. Be reborn or like begin again because just the physical distance is what made it like, not an option, you know, for us at the beginning.

Jeff: So I know we talked earlier that you had well have you gone to that 5k sub amount that we talked about earlier?

Jereme: Yeah, actually. So this is going to be fun to listen back to this interview because it’s an interesting like time period for our channel. Um, because yesterday we got 5,000 subscribers, but beyond that, we are only a couple of weeks out from having basically created a new second channel and splitting things.

Jereme: So this is like a really interesting time as far as I guess the history of the channel goes. So that’d be really interesting in six months, a year or two from now to like go back and sort of listen to like where my head was right now, because that’s one huge takeaway. Now, considering myself a YouTuber and thinking about YouTube all the time is what I thought I knew three months ago was like wrong different three months before that last year, what I thought I knew it’s totally different in a year from now, I’m going to listen back to what I’m saying today and think like, he didn’t know anything.

Jereme: He thought he knew everything, but he didn’t, he was so stupid.

Jeff: So yeah, you said he had started a second channel.

Jeff: Why did you do that? Or what’s your expectations of it?

Jereme: So the, the big issue is, and I mentioned about the name of the channel and we wanted to what we’re eclectic in our collective, and we want it to be able to make videos about anything. So we thought in the umbrella of what you might see at a Comic-Con, or I thought. That would appeal to, I guess, a specific audience.

Jereme: So if you were to go to a Comic-Con or a pop culture convention, you might find pop figures and action figures, die cast cars, comic books, celebrities, you know, there’s panels and there’s artists. And I kind of thought that that was like one umbrella. And if we did anything that contained in that environment, that we’d be safe as far as a niche, but realized now I was wrong.

Jereme: And mostly why is because I thought YouTube would way more the title of your video when making recommendations. And I think what I’m learning is YouTube wants to boil you down as a creator into the simplest possible terms. So they look at common collected and think. We’re a hot wheels channel because at this point, our most successful videos are hot wheels but I hadn’t thought of us that way.

Jereme: And we had made action figure videos, and we want to be able to make other kinds of videos. But once YouTube started to learn that our hot wheels videos are popular, it boiled us down to a hot wheels channel. So our subscribers became people who like other Hotwheels channels. If I look in my analytics and it shows you the other popular channels, that my viewers also watch, they’re all the biggest hot wheels channels.

Jereme: So if we published a video about an action figure, it’s DOA, it’ll have a terrible click through rate on day one, and then it’s, it’s done. It has no shot and that’s really discouraging, like to see when you put in just as much effort, maybe in an action for your video as you would a die-cast video. And it made me really wish that YouTube at the title and cared about that.

Jereme: But I feel like it thinks like it’s boiling it down to the simplest terms. It thinks you like a Com collected video. Here’s another one, but it’s not putting enough weight on the topic. So it just made sense to finally admit it, that plan wasn’t going to work. And we’re in the process of removing our action figure videos, uploading them on a new second channel that’s specific for action figures and then the original channels, since it had the most success with Hot Wheels it’s going to be specifically for die-cast.

Jereme: And I it’s only been a couple of weeks, but I’m already feeling like that was the right call but it’s going to take six months for the action figure channel to have its own legs. You know, even though I literally taken 10 of them down from a channel that had 5,000 subscribers, you re upload them on a new channel.

Jereme: It has like 30 views after a day, it still takes the same time. And momentum. YouTube has to realize who the new viewers are supposed to be and it’s still gonna take a while. It should, hopefully it doesn’t take as long as it’s the first time, because I’ll have all the experience. But, um, it’s gonna take a while before we have two channels that are actually like both standing on their own feet.

Jeff: So are you then a full-time YouTuber now, like monetized and all that?

Jereme: So this is actually where I’m at. So. Once we became monetized, which was in April, 2021. When we reached a thousand subscribers, it was on the backs of a viral video. Or I normally wouldn’t call a viral video, but I think at this point, many other people would, so I’ll go ahead and say it, but it’s nearing 900,000 views.

Jereme: And it has about 85% of our total channel views as one video. We reached a thousand subscribers and then the first month we made about $200. And then I think the next couple months after that, obviously the viral moment subsided, right. It only lasted a couple of weeks, but that video has been still steady in views between like April and August.

Jereme: So we’re continuing to get about two to $300 revenue per month. So. I think it’s more tied to total number of views. And of course, like if your video is longer, it can have more ads on it, you know? And what kind of ads you select to put on the video of those effect things? Oh, and of course the genre, you know, being in a toy genre, it’s definitely like nearing kids, right?

Jereme: It’s not made for kids content, but adults who collect toys, it’s nearing that. So I don’t think it’s particularly as a genre that like advertisers are paying a lot for think of something I never thought of, you know, years ago, obviously I am a collector and that’s what I’m passionate to make videos about.

Jereme: But had I been thinking about finances first, I would have picked a genre or a niche that advertisers really do want to get and it’s not collecting, it’s not toys. So we’re getting kind of like the baseline advertising rate, like the minimum, which if it was two to $300 in a month, that might be 150,000 views.

Jereme: So that’s not a lot, but if you had 150,000 views and your niche was YouTube

Jereme: or like real estate jewelry something like that where advertisers really want to get in front of those videos. They could be making 10 or 15 times as much as me.

Jereme: So just not really in the best niche for that, but that doesn’t make me not want to do it because now that we’ve had the success that we have, it’s super encouraging. To want to continue and see where we are in another six months or another year or two. And I believe we’ll get to a point where it could be my full-time job and I could even do it with my friend, Steve.

Jereme: And we could both be full-time YouTubers, but we’re going to have to get 10 to 15 times as many views as a YouTuber. That’s in a better niche though.

Jeff: So have you tried to use like affiliate income?

Jereme: Um, when I do a toy review video, even like the one we kind of glossed over it, the one that actually got the most views. Is a review of a hot wheels, RC TelsaCyber Truck. So it has kind of a bunch of things going forward, as far as it being like a trendy thing.

Jereme: But that toy for example, is $20. And when it was new, it was exclusive to target. Target has an affiliate program, but not on the toys category. So I can’t make any money by sending people to target. It did come to Amazon later, like maybe six weeks or two months later or something. And I created an Amazon affiliates, you know, account, but if one person bought, like I could have 4,000 views on that video, it might amount to 50 clicks on the Amazon link and then one person buys it.

Jereme: And that one person who bought. I’m a 3% of $20. So it’s a dollar 50, so it’s not adding up even with a video, that’s getting a hundred thousand views in a month. Um, I don’t feel like it’s not worth doing, because if I had 10 videos or 50 videos or a hundred videos that were all driving traffic to Amazon, I think eventually it could add up.

Jereme: But even at this point and getting a lot of views on one video that is of an item that’s for sale on Amazon. Like it’s, it’s not adding up.

Jeff: So that the video that has almost, almost like 900,000 views, was this like a trending topic or is this just, you made the video and it blew up.

Jereme:

Jereme: It was a little bit of, um, everything because it was a little bit of luck because. Hot wheels made to other RC cars. They’re a 1/ 64 scale. So it’s like a three-inch car, but there are RC and that was actually really cool and it wasn’t the cyber truck. They made two other ones and I saw those on the store just randomly at target one day.

Jereme: And I thought, this is cool. I should make a video of it, but I didn’t even feel like I needed to be ahead and like be the first one to make a review or anything. Cause I just thought on the shelf at that point, you know, 20 other YouTubers have already made videos about it didn’t even cross my mind that it would mean something.

Jereme: So I literally told my wife to get me one of those for Christmas and she did and then I reviewed it like in January and it got 10 or 15,000 views maybe within a few weeks, which for me was huge. It was the most I’d ever had at that point and someone commented on that video one day and they said, oh, I just got the cyber truck version.

Jereme: And I didn’t, well, I knew a cyber truck version existed because it had been sold online, uh, as like a limited edition item. I didn’t know it was coming to target. So a commenter literally tipped me off that it was coming to target. And I went out and hunted for it. My friend helped me hunt for it. I forget exactly how I found it.

Jereme: Oh, I, I ordered a couple from scalpers, right. Resellers, because I wanted to get it quickly. Um, but I found one at target made the video about it anyway. So I knew because I had the first video about a similar topic that it had a chance to do well, but I didn’t. I didn’t know for sure that it could like eclipse it and then just kind of go crazy that that really is on the backs of the cyber truck as a, as a topic itself, being just a really trendy, interesting thing that, that people want to click on.

Jereme: Despite it being even probably about a hot wheels, people just genuinely are interested in watching videos about the cyber truck, no matter what they are.

Jereme: When we really started the channel during COVID in June of 2020, so it took like eight months to get like the first 50 subscribers.

Jereme: And then we go from 50 to 2000 in the matter of like six weeks, maybe so all on the backs of that one video. And it’s been my mission since then and that was like an April. This is now August of 2021 to like, try to create more videos that are also successful. So I don’t feel like a one hit wonder because I want to, I want to be in control and feel.

Jereme: I’m successful or the channel is successful because of what I’m doing. And it’s not just lack of one video and it, and it’s not, I mean, I am finding more recent videos that are successful and right now, even this week, um, I have a video that has about 5,000 views in maybe two weeks and I’m hoping that that one starts to really, you know, go upward kind of the way this arbitrary video did, but really that’s, what’s gonna make me feel like really accomplished is when I have more than one video that’s doing extremely well, because right now, like my runner up video, I think it’s like 50,000 views.

Jereme: So when your top video is 900,000 and your number two videos, 50,000, you do feel a little bit out of control. Like, like you’re not in charge, you know,

Jeff: I see your recent video about the rainbow road. I thought that was like a cool concept, but then it speaks to like Mario fans too. It’s a like platform, like someone’s into Mario and it got in front of them. Like I clicked it. I just, I saw it as Mario. It was rainbow road.

Jereme: Yeah, that’s the one I’m really hopeful for, because I mean, I follow the same format as a Cyber Truck video. I did make it a lot longer, but I wanted my video. This is another tip that I have, right. Make your video better than any video on that topic and in this case, if I’m going to review this Mario Cart, rainbow road track set, I want my video to be the best one on YouTube.

Jereme: And for me to do that on this one, I felt like I needed to be super thorough. So it wasn’t just going to be review. I was going to tell you the story of why it’s significant. Do an unboxing show you how to set it up, test it out, review it, show you the problems. So the video was longer, but I wanted it to be like the best all encompassing video.

Jereme: So if people were to like watch another one or two first and then click on mine, they would get, they would get the sense like, oh, this is the good one. This is the video I needed to see first, you know? And then hopefully that transcends into YouTube, like, like through duration, thumbs up subscribe, YouTube will, will understand my video was the good one.

Jereme: And then start to recommend that like at the top, you know, so that’s kind of what happened with the cyber truck video. I mean, we talked about it being viral and trending and all of that, but my video, my review of it, I think was the best on YouTube and it wasn’t the first, but I think it was the best and YouTube figured that out.

Jereme: This is another tip of mine, whatever video you’re editing, cut it down by like 40 to 60% before you finish. My rough draft of the Mario kart rainbow road video was like 21 minutes. And then I cut and cut and cut.

Jereme: And I got it down to like 14 and I even trimmed out a few seconds after I published it in the YouTube editor. So I really wanted it to be like, even though it’s long, it, it it’s edited. It’s really snappy. And it, hopefully it’s engaging. But yeah, any video that anyone’s editing, I mean, I guess maybe a little bit depends on the format, but if it’s something where you’re speaking off the cuff or like this podcast, or even if it’s something that you scripted, once you drop it on your timeline for the first time and you start covering it with video or whatever your process is, cut it down 40% shorter.

Jereme: Listen for yourself to say the same thing twice. Cut it out. You know, there’s there’s three seconds of dead air between two sentences. You know, just, just cut it, cut it, cut it. Listen to your intro. You will explain what the video is about two or three times before you actually start cut it all out.

Jeff: So what do you use to edit your videos since we’re talking about ?

Jereme: So I have a subscription to creative cloud, so I use premiere and Photoshop and all that stuff.

Jeff: like your most recent video about the, uh, rainbow road? How long does it take to like, to film it, edit it, it, like from day one to finish.

Jereme: That one was on the long end, because we were kind of talking about how serious they took it. And I really challenged myself to just make it like the best. It was probably like 30 to 40 hours of work. I think the most efficient I’ve ever been on a video. And we’ve, I’ve made about 50 now because there are some, you know, on the other channel that were moving.

Jereme: And then there were a couple that we’ve unlisted, you know, but maybe like four hours, it’s like, as about as efficient as I could be. And it would be like two minutes long and something I knew really well and I didn’t have to research it, you know, but it’s hard to imagine me making any video that didn’t take at least like four hours, because even if you break it down, An hour to record two hours to edit and then like maybe to build your thumbnail and

Jereme: So I couldn’t imagine being more efficient than but, but for me, you know, obviously I lean in the direction of spending way more time. So the average is probably closer to like 20 hours.

Jeff: Do you have any, what’s your like gear for Youtube?

Jereme: Most recently I’ve been using just iPhones. So actually one of the steps that helped me improve in the last couple months was my mom got herself, a new iPhone and she didn’t need her old one anymore. And she offered it. As my phone, like I would upgrade to her old phone. Cause mine is like six years old

Jereme: I told her, no, I didn’t need it.

Jereme: You know, I was fine with my old phone and then it occurred to me like I should take her old phone and just use it as a camera. So now I shoot with two iPhones. Like mine’s really old. So I mean, I prefer hers because it’s better quality, but, uh, I use I-phones now, even though I’m a professional photographer and I have have a DSLR and it’s full frame.

Jereme: I shoot my YouTube videos on I-phones now. Um, I might, you know, one day want to use a better video, better camera, but the iPhone for the price, like it’s already in your pocket. So there’s that, but the iPhone has a better camera than.

Jereme: A typical DSLR. That’s under like a thousand bucks. You’d have to spend quite a bit to get a camera that has autofocus that’s going to be as good as your iPhone

Jereme: So yeah, mostly I use iPhone, um, for audio. Um, generally I just have a handheld audio recorder. Um, I’m drawing a blank on the name of them, but, um, if you were to go to like guitar center, you could get audio. Well, zoom is a popular brand, but just a, a handheld audio recorder. So it has a microphone built into it.

Jereme: Um, that’s a really good way to just. real easily get good audio because you could just have it sitting on the table in front of you. It has a quarter 20 Jack like a camera. Uh, so you could, you could screw it onto a tripod or a light stand or something and just have it sitting right next to you out of frame.

Jereme: And it’s a microphone like recording device in one. So USB connected your computer or take the micro SD card out and you know, you’d be on the go and that way, you know, you’re not tied to your computer or and you’re going to get way better audio than on your phone or like a DSLR. I mean, obviously you could spend like 500 bucks and get like a really great shotgun mic or something like that and connect it to your, your camera.

Jereme: But like when you’re using an iPhone, like, I don’t even want to record the audio on the phone. Right. I want to record it to a audio recording device so that that’s that’s.

Jereme: a

Jeff: Do you you script your videos or like know free talk points?

Jereme: We do a little bit of everything. So some of our videos are scripted. Uh, I like I’m reviewing a toy. I will do a lot of research online and I’ll actually film me, opening it and setting it up and trying it out. So that’s like our, like a research step. Like I’m learning as I’m getting all my B roll. So when I go back to the computer, having done that, I can add all my own thoughts.

Jereme: So those videos are scripted, but, um, I have made some videos. Recently where I would assemble the B roll in premiere, watch the B roll, like partially assembled, and then challenge myself to not script it, but record a voiceover sort of off the cuff. So it feels a lot like the way our discussion is going right now.

Jereme: Um, but I think that’s the direction I need to try to go in more because it be a lot more efficient, but also make me more human. Like I think not that I’m robotic or a salesman hawker or anything, but if you watched my scripted videos, I’m a little bit more like of a commercial announcer type personality. And when I’m forced to speak off the cuff, It’s just by nature, more real. So I’m challenging myself to do that more. It’s a little weird process. I think like capturing your B roll, then recording audio, like a voiceover impromptu onto it. But I think it, I think it creates the best possible solution, um, you know, in the end because you’re, you’re getting like more organic, natural voiceover, but you still shot all the video first.

Jereme: So you gained all that knowledge that you needed in order to talk about it thoughtfully. If, you know, if I were to like, hold a toy and try to capture real audio in that moment when I’m holding it, I don’t think I could ever do that. And it would be watchable because I’m like learning about it and thinking about it and discovering it like in real time and showing it to you.

Jereme: Like it just it’s just too much, you know, it’s, I think it’s easier to. Film it right. Then sit down and then deliver your voiceover off the cuff, you know, later, but still at that way, it’s not scripted. So anyway, so that’s, that’s the direction that I’m heading?

Jeff: So what’s a, um, maybe what’s like your biggest tip for editing. Is it just the, the cut, everything?

Jereme: Well, that would be my number one tip. Yeah, it would be just make everything shorter, but I guess if I had to give a second one, it would be, you know, be not repeating yourself at the intro. So there was some discussion in the YouTube Facebook group the other day about intro videos, like a stinger, like a little animation at the beginning.

Jereme: And one of the reasons that those I think are a really bad idea is not only because. While that’s happening. The audience is in their brain, turning it off. Like they want to skip ahead or they want to leave the video, even if it’s only a few seconds, because they don’t know how long it’s going to be.

Jereme: Right. So the stinger starts and they want to skip ahead or cut away. But the bigger issue I think, is when a YouTuber uses one of those animations to start their videos off what the 30 seconds or one minute that’s before that is always repeated after the intro. So that first 30 seconds or a minute was never needed.

Jereme: Like if they would cut off the whole the whole 30 seconds to one minute before the stinger and cut the stinger off and then just start the video where they came out of it. They repeat what’s what’s happening. I’ve done it too. You know, I, I have a stinger and I’m going through the growing pains too.

Jereme: And I use it less and less now. And when I do, I’m like super careful to not repeat myself, but it’s just such a obvious, like tendency that, you know, you, you, you tell them what the video is going to be about, do this thing here. And then you come back like as if it was a commercial break, and then you tell them again, what going to be about.

Jereme: We don’t have the, as viewers, we don’t have the patience for that.

Jeff: Yeah. You have to really think of the viewer yourself as the viewer.

Jereme: And if you did a good job with the thumbnail and the title, right. And they’re intrigued and they want to see what the video is about. They don’t want to wait a minute and a half before you start to deliver the content that they were enticed by, you know,

Jeff: So see, you have a website. Do you use that for anything?

Jereme: So basically right now, Com collected.com as a website is kind of like just a landing page for us. Like I want to buy the domain and have it ready for like a use in the future. Uh, we always have like an endless amount of ideas of things that we want do and not just like video ideas, but just like big concepts stuff.

Jereme: Like we were discussing, turning each video into a blog and then publishing blogs on like the website, you know, and have like pictures or still frames from the video. But it would be in written form. Wouldn’t be a video, but that would still be something people could Google and find then take the link to YouTube if they want.

Jereme: So we’re always thinking about like what could be down the road um, so that’s an idea, but like right now, you know, just kind of hanging on to that as like a landing page.

Jeff: So, do you promote your videos? anywhere else? Like, like as far as social media,

Jereme: Not a whole lot. So we created an Instagram page and we, we, we like boosted posts a lot at first and we would put like 15 bucks behind a post and it would get us like five followers or something and then I’m sure almost nobody would see an Instagram post and then click on it and go to YouTube. So we were, that’s kind of, we’re treating that kind of the same way as the website.

Jereme: Like it’s there, we’re putting a little bit of effort into it, but it’s not working right now. So I’m, we’re not putting time in it. Um, I think for someone who already has a big social page on any network, then it may make more sense for them to put more time into trying to get those people over to YouTube.

Jereme: But I think if you think about. Facebook users, Instagram users, Twitter users, YouTube users. And they’re all like plotted on a diagram. There’s only like a small overlap and like people who you might find on Facebook, they may click on your YouTube link. They might not be signed in. So they’re probably not.

Jereme: Well, there are some cool things about it. And well, I guess, so here I will give, like, I guess another practical tip of that we’ve done. So if I review an action figure, let’s just say it’s star wars related. And then I post that link the day that it comes out in that first 24 hours, when the video is new and I share it in a star wars action figure, collecting Facebook group, it might get 50 or a hundred views that day.

Jereme: They’re not impressions. They don’t affect the CTR, but the views do count, you know, his views. And if those people are targeted, right, like if they are collectors of that exact thing and we get them to YouTube and they like it, and it’s a good video, they may watch it to the end. They may even watch another video or subscribe, but the odds just aren’t that great.

Jereme: You know, like you may have like that star wars, Facebook group that might have got 50 views on our video, the day it was posted probably has like 20,000 members. So the number of people that are going to hop over, it’s like really, really low. But what I guess when your channel is new or like, in our case, we’re starting a second channel.

Jereme: For action figure videos. Like those 50 views from Facebook are like majority of the views we got on day one. So they’re meaningful in that way, but like once your channel I think is more functional and YouTube understands enough about your audience. So they know who to send the thumbnail to, and your videos are living and dying on their own, whether or not they’re engaging and they’re performing well then, like if I shared a video of mine, like the Mario kart rainbow video has 5,000 views.

Jereme: If I share that on my Facebook page and it drew five clicks, like what did that do? That didn’t do anything like it’s getting, if it has 5,000 views and it has a CTR of like 9% or 10%, you know, it had 50,000 impressions. So what’s a couple of clicks from Facebook going to do when it’s already got 50,000 impressions from YouTube natively.

Jereme: Yeah, Might not be worth the time. Yeah. Yeah. I think, yeah, if you already have a following or if, you know, you’re just starting out and you shared it in a group and like 50 views would be like

Jereme: the views on day one, then yeah. Do it. But if you’re getting like a thousand, 2000 views on a video then, and you don’t have a huge following it’s, it’s, probably not as worth it.

Jeff: How do you find your help? I guess you just go to YouTube and search it like everybody else does.

Jereme: basically. Yeah. I consume a lot of YouTube if you can’t tell. And I consume a lot of YouTube from like YouTube gurus. So, you know, Brian. G Johnson and Nate from channel makers and all those people. So I generally, you know, do that, but also, uh, I try to look at the like official answers as much as I can, because as cool as those guys are.

Jereme: And I love watching all their videos, they’re getting their info, like from YouTube. So it’s coming through like a middleman and that’s great if they’re digesting information in a way that like, I haven’t explored yet, or like, I don’t have the interpretation that they do, but sometimes engine in general terms, the YouTube gurus, they may like bring up YouTube help info or, Uh, I dunno like the terms and conditions, you know what they’re bringing up like actual Google, YouTube, fine print.

Jereme: Right. And they’re like reading it to me and it’s like, I should’ve just looked there rather than getting it from that third party person. So I try to do that too. And not just automatically believe anything, a YouTube guru says because they contradict each other a lot too.

Jereme: So like only because I consume a lot of it.

Jereme: Do I see where they contradict each other? And then it makes me realize things. You can’t always believe everything they say, because that disagree with each other or even one creator, like someone who’s made tons and tons of YouTube help content like Tim Schmoyer or something. You could probably find videos where he’ll say.

Jereme: One thing about a topic and then find a video where he argues the opposite point, just because he’s done it so much. And I mean, you can look at things in different ways, but you know, they’re not literally speaking for YouTube. So I would put a lot more weight on like, um, I think it’s just called YouTube creators.

Jereme: I think it’s like it’s almost official. If you look at the description of every video, it literally tells you that this is not official from YouTube, even though the YouTubers in those videos are like the software engineers that design YouTube, and they’re telling you how stuff works. There’s still like a caveat of like, this is an official advice from YouTube, but that’s as close, I think, as you’re going to get to like having.

Jereme: Real info, you know, is so I would recommend everyone, you know, check out the YouTube creators channel and learn about YouTube from YouTube, you know, from the people who like build the platform for us, you know, what they say is way more valuable than a YouTube guru.

Jeff: So what’s your current, do you have like a strategy right now for Youtube like, do you know, like five videos ahead or you just one video at a time and.

Jereme: So I have a dry erase board in my office with like 30 ideas on it. And what happens is I’m always adding and removing ideas and it’s not always that I accomplish them sometimes. Like ideas just live on there for a few months. I never get to them. And then through that process, I realized it wasn’t that important or it wasn’t that good of an idea, but I always have like a big pool of ideas that I’m pulling from.

Jereme: And I always try to work on the one that I feel like is the most urgent. So generally it’s about something that is time sensitive, like a toy that’s just released or something that’s upcoming. If we went to a convention and we recorded a lot of video there and I’m going to make that into a few videos.

Jereme: Like I want to do that in a timely fashion. So I’m not publishing videos months after the convention, but, um, that’s basically, that’s basically it. I always have several in the works.

Jeff: So what is number one success tip?

Jereme: I would say beyond the things we’ve already talked about, I would say it’s whatever video you want to make, whatever, like the topic is search for that within YouTube before you start, before you ever even film it or think about it, see what the competition is. See how many views those videos have just to see if it’s even worth it for you to do it.

Jereme: know, um, how good the video actually is like click on the top three or five and watch them, um, are they good? Like, are they not delivering enough information? Are they too long or too short? Are they unwatchable? Like, is it so good? You’ll never be able to make one that good. Right. And then maybe just don’t bother, like I would personally do this, like not searching anyone else, but like if I wanted to make that review of that Hot Wheels Mario kart set, and I saw there was a video that was just amazing checked every single box for me as a viewer.

Jereme: I wouldn’t make one because they’re already existed a perfect video about it. But if. No videos about it, or there are three, but none of them quite got it, right? Because they didn’t hit on these points or whatever. If you feel like you could deliver it better, like, I guess so that’s my tip is, see what else is out there and make it your goal to make yours better.

Jereme: And if you do that, if you make your video better, you deliver better content. Or it’s, doesn’t have to be like a review if it’s a funny video, but yours is funnier. Or if it’s like a clever or witty critique of a movie or something, and you have more ideas that are, you think are better than what this other person did.

Jereme: Like if you think you can do better, you create a better title and a better thumbnail in your video is better. It doesn’t matter if you have 50 subscribers and they have 50,000 YouTube will, I believe will learn that your video is better. And then it will succeed. I mean, that’s what happened with my videos that have done well, I made them better than what was out there, even though other channels that may have had reviews had a bigger audience than I did.

Jereme: And they may have gotten thousands of views on like day one, because they had a big audience already. My video, eventually eclipse theirs, because I made it better. You know? And it doesn’t, it’s not about my filmmaking ability. It’s it’s about like everything else, because we’re talking about using iPhones.

Jereme: Like it’s not about it being fancy. It’s about like what’s in your head and knowing what you want the video to be and like caring more than the other guy, you know? So that’s my tip, like research

Jeff: What’s your number one mistake you’ve made you you’ve thought like, I like how you’re saying, like a year ago you thought you knew this was one mistake. He thought that you knew this was gonna work, whether it’s sub count or whatever it is, then it just totally flopped.

Jereme: It was the, the niche idea where I kind of thought the audience would follow a broad area of collecting and then, you know, kinda realize that YouTube pulled my audience down to hot wheels. And so that, that was my, yeah, that was my, my biggest, I guess, failure or, you know,

Jereme: Yeah. And I like, I have faith that it’s going to work out in the end, but like, yeah, that was the biggest mistake was, you know, you’re uploading videos that are a little different than what your audience expects. They’re not going to click on it. It doesn’t matter if it’s a great video.

Jereme: YouTube is only going to show it to people that they think will like the other videos on your channel it’s boiling them down into two simple terms. So the action figure collectors even saw the thumbnail.

Jeff: Right.

Jereme: They went to hot wheels, people, you know, so.

Jereme: Then YouTube is telling you, you’re only allowed to make Hot Wheel videos. That’s really like discouraging and you want to fight back at it. You want to like, no, I don’t care. Like, go ahead, show my video to only 50 people. I want to like what I like, and I don’t want YouTube to tell me I can’t like it.

Jereme: You know what I mean? So it took a while for me. Accept think the algorithms like weakness and then I think of it in those terms. And, and then at that point it’s like, well, if I want to make action figure videos, then let’s do it on a different channel. And we’ll create a new audience over there that just like the action figures.

Jereme: And then I won’t be fighting an uphill battle that I can’t win against the YouTube algorithm.

Jeff: If you could collaborate with any other Youtuber whether it’s, whether it’s for your channel or just to like, be with somebody else for a day or anything like that, who would it be?

Jereme: Well, I have like probably 10 in mind. like I said, I consume a lot of YouTube, but I think we kinda touched on it a little bit and I feel like there’s something really magical about, about Glenn Webb and he was the action figure reviewer who’d passed away. And I think it I would be remiss to not, you know, take the opportunity to mention him and my gosh, like, you kinda need to be someone that collects action figures, you know, to, to have discovered his videos, you know, back in the day for it to, to make sense.

Jereme: But, um, actually I’ll say this, even if you don’t like action figures, if you watched his videos from five years ago, you would be able to recognize they were good. Like even in 2016, like things were different technology wise, like as far as. Camera ability and all this stuff like, I can’t imagine where he be right now because he was eclipsing 100,000 views in 2016, a hundred thousand subscribers in 2016.

Jereme: If he was still making videos today, he would absolutely be the biggest action figure channel on YouTube and he’d have millions of subscribers. So even now watching his five-year-old videos so you can learn from them. Like he really did it great. And I mean, it’s obviously someone I can’t collab with, but if I had the opportunity, I would probably make like a mini doc about him or something.

Jereme: You know, if, if, if, if things could ever work out in that way, you know, maybe interview a lot of other people that were inspired by him too and let them speak about it. And maybe like put some kind of, uh, a little montage together of clips or something because, uh, even though like today, I’m not, I’m not specifically like imitating him.

Jereme: Like that’s not what I do with my YouTube videos, but I just have like, I guess an unending, like, respect for what he did. And it’s just like a sad coincidence that he passed. You know,

Jeff: This is a good story though. That’s good. Well, that was the last question. I mean, I think we all know where to find you. I, your YouTube channel.

Jeff: Thanks for listening. Hope you liked that episode. Check out some of the references. There’ll be in the show notes or on my website. Check out Glenn. Jeremy really, you know, idolize this person. I’m sure he would love it. If you check out this first picture, just went on YouTube, checked out the VOC used to make, you know, I think he would really appreciate that.

Welcome everybody to the first episode of content creators library. Our first guest is Jeremy. One cool thing to happen to Jeremy is that is one of his videos, almost a million views compared to his other videos. This is huge. This is basically a viral video. We talk about that, how we got there. Let’s not waste your time though.

Jeff: Just get into it and let’s start the show.

Jeff: Well, you can just explain, you know, who you are and what your channel is.

Jereme: All right. Well, my name is Jeremy Guidas and I have two YouTube channels now, actually, but, uh, it’s Com and Collected and Com and Collected: Fast Lane we’re actually just going through some growing pains in our channel, basically just split in two so that’ll be something I’m sure we’ll, we’ll kind of get into a little bit more.

Jeff: Where did the name come from? What is Com and Collected: Fast Lane supposed mean?

Jereme: So I think basically the idea was, I mean, obviously it’s Com C.O.M. And collected, I guess I should have explained that. So Com C.O.M and it kind of references comic books, but to Steve and I, my partner on the channel, it’s also Com like Comic-Con convention. So because we always want it to be able to feature anything that we were collecting, whether it’s action figures or comic books die-cast or anything that really could encompass like something you would see at a convention.

Jereme: That’s kind of where the Com comes from, but as far as it being Com andCollected and a play on words, it’s just a matter of like us being like pretty peaceful agreeable guys. And when we make videos and we discuss things, we’re usually pretty level-headed, and we’re not the kind of YouTuber where that’s going to be super opinionated and like argue and say like controversial things.

Jereme: So that’s kind of where the Com comes from.

Jeff: So how long did you, when did you start a YouTube channel? Like, did you have the hobby before you started the YouTube channel?

Jereme: So, well, there’s a couple of different things. So, I mean, I’ve been collecting since I was a little kid, but, um, I, we started our channel in late 2016. We recorded some of our first videos. That’s really, when we like, decided that we wanted to have a YouTube channel. And we were really inspired by an action figure YouTuber named Glenn Webb.

Jereme: Uh, anyone who’s interested in action figures probably knows Glenn Webb the YouTuber, and he passed away in August of 2016 and looking back at the timeline of how our channel started, I think that had a bigger impact on me than I even realized because of the timing, but it was the first Youtuber that I ever really got to know and like, and then have them pass away.

Jereme: And it was like shocking how much it hit me that I, that it was, it was like a friend, you when you watch a YouTuber, you get to know them and you really do feel like it was a friend who passed away. And still a few months after that, I think we started recording some videos and Steve and I are friends from college, but we live in different cities.

Jereme: So I’m in Pittsburgh and he’s in Baltimore, Maryland. Well, actually Annapolis. But, um, so for us, It was hard. We only got together a few times a year and we were thinking at that time in 2016 that we could only make a video once we met up. So if we met a few times a year and he would like come to Pittsburgh and we would go to a to a Comic-Con would be opportunity to make a video.

Jereme: So that was kind of the idea. And we filmed like six videos in a month or two, and then it took me several months to edit them and get them out. So really after like two years, we had only published five videos and then the channel had a rebirth in 2020 because suddenly the whole world was like virtual and zooming was so easy and made so much sense.

Jereme: And we kind of realized, even if Steve wasn’t literally coming to Pittsburgh to go to a convention where we could make a video together, we could make videos together via zoom. So that was literally what allowed our channel to like. Be reborn or like begin again because just the physical distance is what made it like, not an option, you know, for us at the beginning.

Jeff: So I know we talked earlier that you had well have you gone to that 5k sub amount that we talked about earlier?

Jereme: Yeah, actually. So this is going to be fun to listen back to this interview because it’s an interesting like time period for our channel. Um, because yesterday we got 5,000 subscribers, but beyond that, we are only a couple of weeks out from having basically created a new second channel and splitting things.

Jereme: So this is like a really interesting time as far as I guess the history of the channel goes. So that’d be really interesting in six months, a year or two from now to like go back and sort of listen to like where my head was right now, because that’s one huge takeaway. Now, considering myself a YouTuber and thinking about YouTube all the time is what I thought I knew three months ago was like wrong different three months before that last year, what I thought I knew it’s totally different in a year from now, I’m going to listen back to what I’m saying today and think like, he didn’t know anything.

Jereme: He thought he knew everything, but he didn’t, he was so stupid.

Jeff: So yeah, you said he had started a second channel.

Jeff: Why did you do that? Or what’s your expectations of it?

Jereme: So the, the big issue is, and I mentioned about the name of the channel and we wanted to what we’re eclectic in our collective, and we want it to be able to make videos about anything. So we thought in the umbrella of what you might see at a Comic-Con, or I thought. That would appeal to, I guess, a specific audience.

Jereme: So if you were to go to a Comic-Con or a pop culture convention, you might find pop figures and action figures, die cast cars, comic books, celebrities, you know, there’s panels and there’s artists. And I kind of thought that that was like one umbrella. And if we did anything that contained in that environment, that we’d be safe as far as a niche, but realized now I was wrong.

Jereme: And mostly why is because I thought YouTube would way more the title of your video when making recommendations. And I think what I’m learning is YouTube wants to boil you down as a creator into the simplest possible terms. So they look at common collected and think. We’re a hot wheels channel because at this point, our most successful videos are hot wheels but I hadn’t thought of us that way.

Jereme: And we had made action figure videos, and we want to be able to make other kinds of videos. But once YouTube started to learn that our hot wheels videos are popular, it boiled us down to a hot wheels channel. So our subscribers became people who like other Hotwheels channels. If I look in my analytics and it shows you the other popular channels, that my viewers also watch, they’re all the biggest hot wheels channels.

Jereme: So if we published a video about an action figure, it’s DOA, it’ll have a terrible click through rate on day one, and then it’s, it’s done. It has no shot and that’s really discouraging, like to see when you put in just as much effort, maybe in an action for your video as you would a die-cast video. And it made me really wish that YouTube at the title and cared about that.

Jereme: But I feel like it thinks like it’s boiling it down to the simplest terms. It thinks you like a Com collected video. Here’s another one, but it’s not putting enough weight on the topic. So it just made sense to finally admit it, that plan wasn’t going to work. And we’re in the process of removing our action figure videos, uploading them on a new second channel that’s specific for action figures and then the original channels, since it had the most success with Hot Wheels it’s going to be specifically for die-cast.

Jereme: And I it’s only been a couple of weeks, but I’m already feeling like that was the right call but it’s going to take six months for the action figure channel to have its own legs. You know, even though I literally taken 10 of them down from a channel that had 5,000 subscribers, you re upload them on a new channel.

Jereme: It has like 30 views after a day, it still takes the same time. And momentum. YouTube has to realize who the new viewers are supposed to be and it’s still gonna take a while. It should, hopefully it doesn’t take as long as it’s the first time, because I’ll have all the experience. But, um, it’s gonna take a while before we have two channels that are actually like both standing on their own feet.

Jeff: So are you then a full-time YouTuber now, like monetized and all that?

Jereme: So this is actually where I’m at. So. Once we became monetized, which was in April, 2021. When we reached a thousand subscribers, it was on the backs of a viral video. Or I normally wouldn’t call a viral video, but I think at this point, many other people would, so I’ll go ahead and say it, but it’s nearing 900,000 views.

Jereme: And it has about 85% of our total channel views as one video. We reached a thousand subscribers and then the first month we made about $200. And then I think the next couple months after that, obviously the viral moment subsided, right. It only lasted a couple of weeks, but that video has been still steady in views between like April and August.

Jereme: So we’re continuing to get about two to $300 revenue per month. So. I think it’s more tied to total number of views. And of course, like if your video is longer, it can have more ads on it, you know? And what kind of ads you select to put on the video of those effect things? Oh, and of course the genre, you know, being in a toy genre, it’s definitely like nearing kids, right?

Jereme: It’s not made for kids content, but adults who collect toys, it’s nearing that. So I don’t think it’s particularly as a genre that like advertisers are paying a lot for think of something I never thought of, you know, years ago, obviously I am a collector and that’s what I’m passionate to make videos about.

Jereme: But had I been thinking about finances first, I would have picked a genre or a niche that advertisers really do want to get and it’s not collecting, it’s not toys. So we’re getting kind of like the baseline advertising rate, like the minimum, which if it was two to $300 in a month, that might be 150,000 views.

Jereme: So that’s not a lot, but if you had 150,000 views and your niche was YouTube

Jereme: or like real estate jewelry something like that where advertisers really want to get in front of those videos. They could be making 10 or 15 times as much as me.

Jereme: So just not really in the best niche for that, but that doesn’t make me not want to do it because now that we’ve had the success that we have, it’s super encouraging. To want to continue and see where we are in another six months or another year or two. And I believe we’ll get to a point where it could be my full-time job and I could even do it with my friend, Steve.

Jereme: And we could both be full-time YouTubers, but we’re going to have to get 10 to 15 times as many views as a YouTuber. That’s in a better niche though.

Jeff: So have you tried to use like affiliate income?

Jereme: Um, when I do a toy review video, even like the one we kind of glossed over it, the one that actually got the most views. Is a review of a hot wheels, RC TelsaCyber Truck. So it has kind of a bunch of things going forward, as far as it being like a trendy thing.

Jereme: But that toy for example, is $20. And when it was new, it was exclusive to target. Target has an affiliate program, but not on the toys category. So I can’t make any money by sending people to target. It did come to Amazon later, like maybe six weeks or two months later or something. And I created an Amazon affiliates, you know, account, but if one person bought, like I could have 4,000 views on that video, it might amount to 50 clicks on the Amazon link and then one person buys it.

Jereme: And that one person who bought. I’m a 3% of $20. So it’s a dollar 50, so it’s not adding up even with a video, that’s getting a hundred thousand views in a month. Um, I don’t feel like it’s not worth doing, because if I had 10 videos or 50 videos or a hundred videos that were all driving traffic to Amazon, I think eventually it could add up.

Jereme: But even at this point and getting a lot of views on one video that is of an item that’s for sale on Amazon. Like it’s, it’s not adding up.

Jeff: So that the video that has almost, almost like 900,000 views, was this like a trending topic or is this just, you made the video and it blew up.

Jereme:

Jereme: It was a little bit of, um, everything because it was a little bit of luck because. Hot wheels made to other RC cars. They’re a 1/ 64 scale. So it’s like a three-inch car, but there are RC and that was actually really cool and it wasn’t the cyber truck. They made two other ones and I saw those on the store just randomly at target one day.

Jereme: And I thought, this is cool. I should make a video of it, but I didn’t even feel like I needed to be ahead and like be the first one to make a review or anything. Cause I just thought on the shelf at that point, you know, 20 other YouTubers have already made videos about it didn’t even cross my mind that it would mean something.

Jereme: So I literally told my wife to get me one of those for Christmas and she did and then I reviewed it like in January and it got 10 or 15,000 views maybe within a few weeks, which for me was huge. It was the most I’d ever had at that point and someone commented on that video one day and they said, oh, I just got the cyber truck version.

Jereme: And I didn’t, well, I knew a cyber truck version existed because it had been sold online, uh, as like a limited edition item. I didn’t know it was coming to target. So a commenter literally tipped me off that it was coming to target. And I went out and hunted for it. My friend helped me hunt for it. I forget exactly how I found it.

Jereme: Oh, I, I ordered a couple from scalpers, right. Resellers, because I wanted to get it quickly. Um, but I found one at target made the video about it anyway. So I knew because I had the first video about a similar topic that it had a chance to do well, but I didn’t. I didn’t know for sure that it could like eclipse it and then just kind of go crazy that that really is on the backs of the cyber truck as a, as a topic itself, being just a really trendy, interesting thing that, that people want to click on.

Jereme: Despite it being even probably about a hot wheels, people just genuinely are interested in watching videos about the cyber truck, no matter what they are.

Jereme: When we really started the channel during COVID in June of 2020, so it took like eight months to get like the first 50 subscribers.

Jereme: And then we go from 50 to 2000 in the matter of like six weeks, maybe so all on the backs of that one video. And it’s been my mission since then and that was like an April. This is now August of 2021 to like, try to create more videos that are also successful. So I don’t feel like a one hit wonder because I want to, I want to be in control and feel.

Jereme: I’m successful or the channel is successful because of what I’m doing. And it’s not just lack of one video and it, and it’s not, I mean, I am finding more recent videos that are successful and right now, even this week, um, I have a video that has about 5,000 views in maybe two weeks and I’m hoping that that one starts to really, you know, go upward kind of the way this arbitrary video did, but really that’s, what’s gonna make me feel like really accomplished is when I have more than one video that’s doing extremely well, because right now, like my runner up video, I think it’s like 50,000 views.

Jereme: So when your top video is 900,000 and your number two videos, 50,000, you do feel a little bit out of control. Like, like you’re not in charge, you know,

Jeff: I see your recent video about the rainbow road. I thought that was like a cool concept, but then it speaks to like Mario fans too. It’s a like platform, like someone’s into Mario and it got in front of them. Like I clicked it. I just, I saw it as Mario. It was rainbow road.

Jereme: Yeah, that’s the one I’m really hopeful for, because I mean, I follow the same format as a Cyber Truck video. I did make it a lot longer, but I wanted my video. This is another tip that I have, right. Make your video better than any video on that topic and in this case, if I’m going to review this Mario Cart, rainbow road track set, I want my video to be the best one on YouTube.

Jereme: And for me to do that on this one, I felt like I needed to be super thorough. So it wasn’t just going to be review. I was going to tell you the story of why it’s significant. Do an unboxing show you how to set it up, test it out, review it, show you the problems. So the video was longer, but I wanted it to be like the best all encompassing video.

Jereme: So if people were to like watch another one or two first and then click on mine, they would get, they would get the sense like, oh, this is the good one. This is the video I needed to see first, you know? And then hopefully that transcends into YouTube, like, like through duration, thumbs up subscribe, YouTube will, will understand my video was the good one.

Jereme: And then start to recommend that like at the top, you know, so that’s kind of what happened with the cyber truck video. I mean, we talked about it being viral and trending and all of that, but my video, my review of it, I think was the best on YouTube and it wasn’t the first, but I think it was the best and YouTube figured that out.

Jereme: This is another tip of mine, whatever video you’re editing, cut it down by like 40 to 60% before you finish. My rough draft of the Mario kart rainbow road video was like 21 minutes. And then I cut and cut and cut.

Jereme: And I got it down to like 14 and I even trimmed out a few seconds after I published it in the YouTube editor. So I really wanted it to be like, even though it’s long, it, it it’s edited. It’s really snappy. And it, hopefully it’s engaging. But yeah, any video that anyone’s editing, I mean, I guess maybe a little bit depends on the format, but if it’s something where you’re speaking off the cuff or like this podcast, or even if it’s something that you scripted, once you drop it on your timeline for the first time and you start covering it with video or whatever your process is, cut it down 40% shorter.

Jereme: Listen for yourself to say the same thing twice. Cut it out. You know, there’s there’s three seconds of dead air between two sentences. You know, just, just cut it, cut it, cut it. Listen to your intro. You will explain what the video is about two or three times before you actually start cut it all out.

Jeff: So what do you use to edit your videos since we’re talking about ?

Jereme: So I have a subscription to creative cloud, so I use premiere and Photoshop and all that stuff.

Jeff: like your most recent video about the, uh, rainbow road? How long does it take to like, to film it, edit it, it, like from day one to finish.

Jereme: That one was on the long end, because we were kind of talking about how serious they took it. And I really challenged myself to just make it like the best. It was probably like 30 to 40 hours of work. I think the most efficient I’ve ever been on a video. And we’ve, I’ve made about 50 now because there are some, you know, on the other channel that were moving.

Jereme: And then there were a couple that we’ve unlisted, you know, but maybe like four hours, it’s like, as about as efficient as I could be. And it would be like two minutes long and something I knew really well and I didn’t have to research it, you know, but it’s hard to imagine me making any video that didn’t take at least like four hours, because even if you break it down, An hour to record two hours to edit and then like maybe to build your thumbnail and

Jereme: So I couldn’t imagine being more efficient than but, but for me, you know, obviously I lean in the direction of spending way more time. So the average is probably closer to like 20 hours.

Jeff: Do you have any, what’s your like gear for Youtube?

Jereme: Most recently I’ve been using just iPhones. So actually one of the steps that helped me improve in the last couple months was my mom got herself, a new iPhone and she didn’t need her old one anymore. And she offered it. As my phone, like I would upgrade to her old phone. Cause mine is like six years old

Jereme: I told her, no, I didn’t need it.

Jereme: You know, I was fine with my old phone and then it occurred to me like I should take her old phone and just use it as a camera. So now I shoot with two iPhones. Like mine’s really old. So I mean, I prefer hers because it’s better quality, but, uh, I use I-phones now, even though I’m a professional photographer and I have have a DSLR and it’s full frame.

Jereme: I shoot my YouTube videos on I-phones now. Um, I might, you know, one day want to use a better video, better camera, but the iPhone for the price, like it’s already in your pocket. So there’s that, but the iPhone has a better camera than.

Jereme: A typical DSLR. That’s under like a thousand bucks. You’d have to spend quite a bit to get a camera that has autofocus that’s going to be as good as your iPhone

Jereme: So yeah, mostly I use iPhone, um, for audio. Um, generally I just have a handheld audio recorder. Um, I’m drawing a blank on the name of them, but, um, if you were to go to like guitar center, you could get audio. Well, zoom is a popular brand, but just a, a handheld audio recorder. So it has a microphone built into it.

Jereme: Um, that’s a really good way to just. real easily get good audio because you could just have it sitting on the table in front of you. It has a quarter 20 Jack like a camera. Uh, so you could, you could screw it onto a tripod or a light stand or something and just have it sitting right next to you out of frame.

Jereme: And it’s a microphone like recording device in one. So USB connected your computer or take the micro SD card out and you know, you’d be on the go and that way, you know, you’re not tied to your computer or and you’re going to get way better audio than on your phone or like a DSLR. I mean, obviously you could spend like 500 bucks and get like a really great shotgun mic or something like that and connect it to your, your camera.

Jereme: But like when you’re using an iPhone, like, I don’t even want to record the audio on the phone. Right. I want to record it to a audio recording device so that that’s that’s.

Jereme: a

Jeff: Do you you script your videos or like know free talk points?

Jereme: We do a little bit of everything. So some of our videos are scripted. Uh, I like I’m reviewing a toy. I will do a lot of research online and I’ll actually film me, opening it and setting it up and trying it out. So that’s like our, like a research step. Like I’m learning as I’m getting all my B roll. So when I go back to the computer, having done that, I can add all my own thoughts.

Jereme: So those videos are scripted, but, um, I have made some videos. Recently where I would assemble the B roll in premiere, watch the B roll, like partially assembled, and then challenge myself to not script it, but record a voiceover sort of off the cuff. So it feels a lot like the way our discussion is going right now.

Jereme: Um, but I think that’s the direction I need to try to go in more because it be a lot more efficient, but also make me more human. Like I think not that I’m robotic or a salesman hawker or anything, but if you watched my scripted videos, I’m a little bit more like of a commercial announcer type personality. And when I’m forced to speak off the cuff, It’s just by nature, more real. So I’m challenging myself to do that more. It’s a little weird process. I think like capturing your B roll, then recording audio, like a voiceover impromptu onto it. But I think it, I think it creates the best possible solution, um, you know, in the end because you’re, you’re getting like more organic, natural voiceover, but you still shot all the video first.

Jereme: So you gained all that knowledge that you needed in order to talk about it thoughtfully. If, you know, if I were to like, hold a toy and try to capture real audio in that moment when I’m holding it, I don’t think I could ever do that. And it would be watchable because I’m like learning about it and thinking about it and discovering it like in real time and showing it to you.

Jereme: Like it just it’s just too much, you know, it’s, I think it’s easier to. Film it right. Then sit down and then deliver your voiceover off the cuff, you know, later, but still at that way, it’s not scripted. So anyway, so that’s, that’s the direction that I’m heading?

Jeff: So what’s a, um, maybe what’s like your biggest tip for editing. Is it just the, the cut, everything?

Jereme: Well, that would be my number one tip. Yeah, it would be just make everything shorter, but I guess if I had to give a second one, it would be, you know, be not repeating yourself at the intro. So there was some discussion in the YouTube Facebook group the other day about intro videos, like a stinger, like a little animation at the beginning.

Jereme: And one of the reasons that those I think are a really bad idea is not only because. While that’s happening. The audience is in their brain, turning it off. Like they want to skip ahead or they want to leave the video, even if it’s only a few seconds, because they don’t know how long it’s going to be.

Jereme: Right. So the stinger starts and they want to skip ahead or cut away. But the bigger issue I think, is when a YouTuber uses one of those animations to start their videos off what the 30 seconds or one minute that’s before that is always repeated after the intro. So that first 30 seconds or a minute was never needed.

Jereme: Like if they would cut off the whole the whole 30 seconds to one minute before the stinger and cut the stinger off and then just start the video where they came out of it. They repeat what’s what’s happening. I’ve done it too. You know, I, I have a stinger and I’m going through the growing pains too.

Jereme: And I use it less and less now. And when I do, I’m like super careful to not repeat myself, but it’s just such a obvious, like tendency that, you know, you, you, you tell them what the video is going to be about, do this thing here. And then you come back like as if it was a commercial break, and then you tell them again, what going to be about.

Jereme: We don’t have the, as viewers, we don’t have the patience for that.

Jeff: Yeah. You have to really think of the viewer yourself as the viewer.

Jereme: And if you did a good job with the thumbnail and the title, right. And they’re intrigued and they want to see what the video is about. They don’t want to wait a minute and a half before you start to deliver the content that they were enticed by, you know,

Jeff: So see, you have a website. Do you use that for anything?

Jereme: So basically right now, Com collected.com as a website is kind of like just a landing page for us. Like I want to buy the domain and have it ready for like a use in the future. Uh, we always have like an endless amount of ideas of things that we want do and not just like video ideas, but just like big concepts stuff.

Jereme: Like we were discussing, turning each video into a blog and then publishing blogs on like the website, you know, and have like pictures or still frames from the video. But it would be in written form. Wouldn’t be a video, but that would still be something people could Google and find then take the link to YouTube if they want.

Jereme: So we’re always thinking about like what could be down the road um, so that’s an idea, but like right now, you know, just kind of hanging on to that as like a landing page.

Jeff: So, do you promote your videos? anywhere else? Like, like as far as social media,

Jereme: Not a whole lot. So we created an Instagram page and we, we, we like boosted posts a lot at first and we would put like 15 bucks behind a post and it would get us like five followers or something and then I’m sure almost nobody would see an Instagram post and then click on it and go to YouTube. So we were, that’s kind of, we’re treating that kind of the same way as the website.

Jereme: Like it’s there, we’re putting a little bit of effort into it, but it’s not working right now. So I’m, we’re not putting time in it. Um, I think for someone who already has a big social page on any network, then it may make more sense for them to put more time into trying to get those people over to YouTube.

Jereme: But I think if you think about. Facebook users, Instagram users, Twitter users, YouTube users. And they’re all like plotted on a diagram. There’s only like a small overlap and like people who you might find on Facebook, they may click on your YouTube link. They might not be signed in. So they’re probably not.

Jereme: Well, there are some cool things about it. And well, I guess, so here I will give, like, I guess another practical tip of that we’ve done. So if I review an action figure, let’s just say it’s star wars related. And then I post that link the day that it comes out in that first 24 hours, when the video is new and I share it in a star wars action figure, collecting Facebook group, it might get 50 or a hundred views that day.

Jereme: They’re not impressions. They don’t affect the CTR, but the views do count, you know, his views. And if those people are targeted, right, like if they are collectors of that exact thing and we get them to YouTube and they like it, and it’s a good video, they may watch it to the end. They may even watch another video or subscribe, but the odds just aren’t that great.

Jereme: You know, like you may have like that star wars, Facebook group that might have got 50 views on our video, the day it was posted probably has like 20,000 members. So the number of people that are going to hop over, it’s like really, really low. But what I guess when your channel is new or like, in our case, we’re starting a second channel.

Jereme: For action figure videos. Like those 50 views from Facebook are like majority of the views we got on day one. So they’re meaningful in that way, but like once your channel I think is more functional and YouTube understands enough about your audience. So they know who to send the thumbnail to, and your videos are living and dying on their own, whether or not they’re engaging and they’re performing well then, like if I shared a video of mine, like the Mario kart rainbow video has 5,000 views.

Jereme: If I share that on my Facebook page and it drew five clicks, like what did that do? That didn’t do anything like it’s getting, if it has 5,000 views and it has a CTR of like 9% or 10%, you know, it had 50,000 impressions. So what’s a couple of clicks from Facebook going to do when it’s already got 50,000 impressions from YouTube natively.

Jereme: Yeah, Might not be worth the time. Yeah. Yeah. I think, yeah, if you already have a following or if, you know, you’re just starting out and you shared it in a group and like 50 views would be like

Jereme: the views on day one, then yeah. Do it. But if you’re getting like a thousand, 2000 views on a video then, and you don’t have a huge following it’s, it’s, probably not as worth it.

Jeff: How do you find your help? I guess you just go to YouTube and search it like everybody else does.

Jereme: basically. Yeah. I consume a lot of YouTube if you can’t tell. And I consume a lot of YouTube from like YouTube gurus. So, you know, Brian. G Johnson and Nate from channel makers and all those people. So I generally, you know, do that, but also, uh, I try to look at the like official answers as much as I can, because as cool as those guys are.

Jereme: And I love watching all their videos, they’re getting their info, like from YouTube. So it’s coming through like a middleman and that’s great if they’re digesting information in a way that like, I haven’t explored yet, or like, I don’t have the interpretation that they do, but sometimes engine in general terms, the YouTube gurus, they may like bring up YouTube help info or, Uh, I dunno like the terms and conditions, you know what they’re bringing up like actual Google, YouTube, fine print.

Jereme: Right. And they’re like reading it to me and it’s like, I should’ve just looked there rather than getting it from that third party person. So I try to do that too. And not just automatically believe anything, a YouTube guru says because they contradict each other a lot too.

Jereme: So like only because I consume a lot of it.

Jereme: Do I see where they contradict each other? And then it makes me realize things. You can’t always believe everything they say, because that disagree with each other or even one creator, like someone who’s made tons and tons of YouTube help content like Tim Schmoyer or something. You could probably find videos where he’ll say.

Jereme: One thing about a topic and then find a video where he argues the opposite point, just because he’s done it so much. And I mean, you can look at things in different ways, but you know, they’re not literally speaking for YouTube. So I would put a lot more weight on like, um, I think it’s just called YouTube creators.

Jereme: I think it’s like it’s almost official. If you look at the description of every video, it literally tells you that this is not official from YouTube, even though the YouTubers in those videos are like the software engineers that design YouTube, and they’re telling you how stuff works. There’s still like a caveat of like, this is an official advice from YouTube, but that’s as close, I think, as you’re going to get to like having.

Jereme: Real info, you know, is so I would recommend everyone, you know, check out the YouTube creators channel and learn about YouTube from YouTube, you know, from the people who like build the platform for us, you know, what they say is way more valuable than a YouTube guru.

Jeff: So what’s your current, do you have like a strategy right now for Youtube like, do you know, like five videos ahead or you just one video at a time and.

Jereme: So I have a dry erase board in my office with like 30 ideas on it. And what happens is I’m always adding and removing ideas and it’s not always that I accomplish them sometimes. Like ideas just live on there for a few months. I never get to them. And then through that process, I realized it wasn’t that important or it wasn’t that good of an idea, but I always have like a big pool of ideas that I’m pulling from.

Jereme: And I always try to work on the one that I feel like is the most urgent. So generally it’s about something that is time sensitive, like a toy that’s just released or something that’s upcoming. If we went to a convention and we recorded a lot of video there and I’m going to make that into a few videos.

Jereme: Like I want to do that in a timely fashion. So I’m not publishing videos months after the convention, but, um, that’s basically, that’s basically it. I always have several in the works.

Jeff: So what is number one success tip?

Jereme: I would say beyond the things we’ve already talked about, I would say it’s whatever video you want to make, whatever, like the topic is search for that within YouTube before you start, before you ever even film it or think about it, see what the competition is. See how many views those videos have just to see if it’s even worth it for you to do it.

Jereme: know, um, how good the video actually is like click on the top three or five and watch them, um, are they good? Like, are they not delivering enough information? Are they too long or too short? Are they unwatchable? Like, is it so good? You’ll never be able to make one that good. Right. And then maybe just don’t bother, like I would personally do this, like not searching anyone else, but like if I wanted to make that review of that Hot Wheels Mario kart set, and I saw there was a video that was just amazing checked every single box for me as a viewer.

Jereme: I wouldn’t make one because they’re already existed a perfect video about it. But if. No videos about it, or there are three, but none of them quite got it, right? Because they didn’t hit on these points or whatever. If you feel like you could deliver it better, like, I guess so that’s my tip is, see what else is out there and make it your goal to make yours better.

Jereme: And if you do that, if you make your video better, you deliver better content. Or it’s, doesn’t have to be like a review if it’s a funny video, but yours is funnier. Or if it’s like a clever or witty critique of a movie or something, and you have more ideas that are, you think are better than what this other person did.

Jereme: Like if you think you can do better, you create a better title and a better thumbnail in your video is better. It doesn’t matter if you have 50 subscribers and they have 50,000 YouTube will, I believe will learn that your video is better. And then it will succeed. I mean, that’s what happened with my videos that have done well, I made them better than what was out there, even though other channels that may have had reviews had a bigger audience than I did.

Jereme: And they may have gotten thousands of views on like day one, because they had a big audience already. My video, eventually eclipse theirs, because I made it better. You know? And it doesn’t, it’s not about my filmmaking ability. It’s it’s about like everything else, because we’re talking about using iPhones.

Jereme: Like it’s not about it being fancy. It’s about like what’s in your head and knowing what you want the video to be and like caring more than the other guy, you know? So that’s my tip, like research

Jeff: What’s your number one mistake you’ve made you you’ve thought like, I like how you’re saying, like a year ago you thought you knew this was one mistake. He thought that you knew this was gonna work, whether it’s sub count or whatever it is, then it just totally flopped.

Jereme: It was the, the niche idea where I kind of thought the audience would follow a broad area of collecting and then, you know, kinda realize that YouTube pulled my audience down to hot wheels. And so that, that was my, yeah, that was my, my biggest, I guess, failure or, you know,

Jereme: Yeah. And I like, I have faith that it’s going to work out in the end, but like, yeah, that was the biggest mistake was, you know, you’re uploading videos that are a little different than what your audience expects. They’re not going to click on it. It doesn’t matter if it’s a great video.

Jereme: YouTube is only going to show it to people that they think will like the other videos on your channel it’s boiling them down into two simple terms. So the action figure collectors even saw the thumbnail.

Jeff: Right.

Jereme: They went to hot wheels, people, you know, so.

Jereme: Then YouTube is telling you, you’re only allowed to make Hot Wheel videos. That’s really like discouraging and you want to fight back at it. You want to like, no, I don’t care. Like, go ahead, show my video to only 50 people. I want to like what I like, and I don’t want YouTube to tell me I can’t like it.

Jereme: You know what I mean? So it took a while for me. Accept think the algorithms like weakness and then I think of it in those terms. And, and then at that point it’s like, well, if I want to make action figure videos, then let’s do it on a different channel. And we’ll create a new audience over there that just like the action figures.

Jereme: And then I won’t be fighting an uphill battle that I can’t win against the YouTube algorithm.

Jeff: If you could collaborate with any other Youtuber whether it’s, whether it’s for your channel or just to like, be with somebody else for a day or anything like that, who would it be?

Jereme: Well, I have like probably 10 in mind. like I said, I consume a lot of YouTube, but I think we kinda touched on it a little bit and I feel like there’s something really magical about, about Glenn Webb and he was the action figure reviewer who’d passed away. And I think it I would be remiss to not, you know, take the opportunity to mention him and my gosh, like, you kinda need to be someone that collects action figures, you know, to, to have discovered his videos, you know, back in the day for it to, to make sense.

Jereme: But, um, actually I’ll say this, even if you don’t like action figures, if you watched his videos from five years ago, you would be able to recognize they were good. Like even in 2016, like things were different technology wise, like as far as. Camera ability and all this stuff like, I can’t imagine where he be right now because he was eclipsing 100,000 views in 2016, a hundred thousand subscribers in 2016.

Jereme: If he was still making videos today, he would absolutely be the biggest action figure channel on YouTube and he’d have millions of subscribers. So even now watching his five-year-old videos so you can learn from them. Like he really did it great. And I mean, it’s obviously someone I can’t collab with, but if I had the opportunity, I would probably make like a mini doc about him or something.

Jereme: You know, if, if, if, if things could ever work out in that way, you know, maybe interview a lot of other people that were inspired by him too and let them speak about it. And maybe like put some kind of, uh, a little montage together of clips or something because, uh, even though like today, I’m not, I’m not specifically like imitating him.

Jereme: Like that’s not what I do with my YouTube videos, but I just have like, I guess an unending, like, respect for what he did. And it’s just like a sad coincidence that he passed. You know,

Jeff: This is a good story though. That’s good. Well, that was the last question. I mean, I think we all know where to find you. I, your YouTube channel.

Jeff: Thanks for listening. Hope you liked that episode. Check out some of the references. There’ll be in the show notes or on my website. Check out Glenn. Jeremy really, you know, idolize this person. I’m sure he would love it. If you check out this first picture, just went on YouTube, checked out the VOC used to make, you know, I think he would really appreciate that.

 

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